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Posted by in News | October 24, 2014

Friday November 21st, 2014

Xtreme Teens: Turkey Lurkey

Date: November 21, 2014

Time: 7:00pm to 10:00pm

Venue:

Address:

3900 Sellman Road

Beltsville, MD 20704

Cost: Free with M-NCPPC Youth ID

Website: Click to visit the site

Bring your creativity and appetite as we make a delicious turkey. Feel free to enjoy it here with us or take it home and share it. Ages : 10-17

Friday Class

Date: November 21, 2014

Time: 9:30am to 11:15am

Location:
7117 Maple Avenue, Takoma Park, MD 20912
Washington, DC 20001

Cost: $12/Class; Class Card $100/10 Classes

From: Dance Exchange

Website: Click to visit the site

Come join us for Friday Class at the Dance Exchange

A dance class for those ranging from long-time movers and makers to those who are curious about or new to the DC dance community. Classes are drop-in. Live music by David Schulman and Mark H. Rooney. 18+

Email mail@danceexchange.org, or call 301-720-6700

Work-study available. contact MatthewC@danceexchange.org for details

Exhibition – Lost And Found Laurel

Date: November 21, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Venue:

Address:
817 Main Street
Laurel, MD 20707

From: History of The Laurel Historical Society

Website: Click to visit the site

The exhibit includes sections on schools, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, libraries, and festivals. A variety of objects ranging from trucks to high school football uniforms and varsity jackets to restaurant menus will be featured throughout. Highlights include a “Hershey” sign from Knapps News Service, a wall papered with matchbook covers from Laurel businesses, a “restaurant” area with tables and menus, and a school room. Visitors will also have the opportunity to help the Laurel Historical Society (LHS) identify unknown people and places that are part of its archives.
One section:  “The Good Old Days…?” is a sobering reminder that not all memories of the period were good ones.  The panel incorporates photos and newspaper stories from the 1960s. It reminds visitors that that Laurel citizens were struggling through integration efforts, KKK cross burnings and firebombs and that tensions between the black and white communities were high.

Exhibition – Alphabetilately

Date: November 21, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:
Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Since 1993 the Smithsonian National Postal Museum has developed engaging exhibitions and entertaining public programs for families, students and serious collectors.

To celebrate our 15th anniversary, the museum is showing an exhibition rich in philatelic fascination and designerly detail called, Alphabetilately!

ALPHABET + PHILATELY or Alphabetilately is the alphabet of philately.

Each of the 26 letters stands for some aspect of the collecting of stamps or the sending of mail. The stamps, ephemera, and artifacts exhibited in Alphabetilately graphically document the spectrum of the American experience, from historical subjects to popular culture, from actual events to important ideas.

Alphabetilately is a universally appealing exhibition and a lively educational experience for visitors of every age.

It provides an extraordinary showcase for selections from our unparalleled collection of American postal and philatelic history.

Exhibition – Pacific Exchange China And Us Mail

Date: November 21, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Today, China and the United States are the world’s two largest economies, major powers that often cooperate strategically. They also share a complicated history. The two have been World War II allies and Cold War enemies, partners and rivals.

Using mail and stamps, Pacific Exchange brings a human scale to Chinese-U.S. relations in three areas: commerce, culture, and community. The exhibit focuses on the 1860s to the 1970s, a time of extraordinary change in China. It also explores Chinese immigration to the United States, now home to four million Chinese Americans.

Most Chinese names and locations in this exhibit are written in the modern pinyin style (for example, Beijing instead of Peking), with some exceptions.

The Chinese panels are written in simplified Chinese.

Exhibition – Home Sewn: Quilts From The Lower Mississippi Valley

Date: November 21, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

The first in a series of collections-focused exhibitions, Home Sewn features quilts created by Annie Dennis (1904­­–1997) and Emma Russell (1909–2004). Quilts represent classic American quilt patterns and techniques passed down through five generations. This exhibition examine the generational, social, and economic fabric of an African American quilting community in rural Mississippi. In addition, fieldwork and interviews with present-day African American women quilters give voice to the continuing tradition of quilting in these communities.

Exhibition – Ubuhle Women: Beadwork And The Art Of Independence

Date: November 21, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Ndwango (means “cloth”) is a new form of bead art developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Ubuhle (means “beautiful”) artists’ community was established in 1999 by local resident Bev Gibson and master beader Ntombephi Ntombela [En-Tom-be-Fi En-tom-bell-la] to empower local women with the means to provide for their families through their art. The flat surface of the textile onto which the Ubuhle women bead is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts that many of them grew up wearing. Using black fabric as a canvas and different colored Czech glass beads as the medium of expression, the Ubuhle community has re-imagined the longstanding beading tradition as a contemporary art form. Twenty-nine works are featured, including The African Cruxifixion.

Exhibition – Indelible: The Platinum Photographs Of Larry McNeil And Will Wilson

Date: November 21, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
Fourth Street and Jefferson Drive, SW
Washington, DC 20001
From: National Museum of The American Indian
Website: Click to visit the site

By the end of the 19th century, the platinum print process was of primary importance to art photographers—valued for its permanence, wide tonal variation, and “fuzzy” aesthetic. Photographers such as Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Käsebier, and Joseph Keiley famously printed their photographs of North American Indians on platinum paper, using the prints’ highly romanticizing softness to represent the “Vanishing Race.”

Larry McNeil (Tlingit/Nisgaá) and Will Wilson (Diné/Bilagaana) challenge this visual ideology. McNeil uses the platinum process to topple expectations of what constitutes the Native portrait and, more generally, Western conceptions of portraiture. Wilson creates portraits of “today’s Indians” on metal plates, then digitizes the plates, makes large-scale digital negatives from the scanned images, and uses historic printing processes in a wet darkroom—calling attention to the manufactured nature of all photographic images.

Saturday November 22nd, 2014

Xtreme Teens: Floats and Floats of Fun

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 7:00pm to 10:00pm

Venue:

Address:

8601 Good Luck Road

Lanham, MD 20706

Website: Click to visit the site

Get your taste buds ready for delicious pre-holiday treat–ice cream floats! Then follow it up with awesome indoor strategy games in the gym.
Ages:  10 – 17 years
Cost:  Free with M-NCPPC Youth ID

Xtreme Teens: Silly Carnival Games

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 7:00pm to 10:00pm

Venue:

Address:

3900 Sellman Road

Beltsville, MD 20704

Website: Click to visit the site

Here’s your chance to clown around with your friends. Enjoy a Saturday night full of carnival games and compete to see who can win the most games.
Ages:  10 – 17 years
Cost:  Free with M-NCPPC Youth ID

King of Prussia: Shopping Trip

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 8:00am to 8:00pm

Venue:

Address:

5051 Pierce Avenue

College Park, MD 20740

Website: Click to visit the site

Shop til you drop! Get your holiday gifts at the King of Prussia Mall on this shopping trip. One of the largest malls on the east coast, you’re bound to satisfy all of your holiday shopping needs.

Ages:  18 & up

Cost:  For Resident: $40.00; Non-Resident: $48.00

Exhibition – Lost And Found Laurel

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Venue:

Address:
817 Main Street
Laurel, MD 20707

From: History of The Laurel Historical Society

Website: Click to visit the site

The exhibit includes sections on schools, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, libraries, and festivals. A variety of objects ranging from trucks to high school football uniforms and varsity jackets to restaurant menus will be featured throughout. Highlights include a “Hershey” sign from Knapps News Service, a wall papered with matchbook covers from Laurel businesses, a “restaurant” area with tables and menus, and a school room. Visitors will also have the opportunity to help the Laurel Historical Society (LHS) identify unknown people and places that are part of its archives.
One section:  “The Good Old Days…?” is a sobering reminder that not all memories of the period were good ones.  The panel incorporates photos and newspaper stories from the 1960s. It reminds visitors that that Laurel citizens were struggling through integration efforts, KKK cross burnings and firebombs and that tensions between the black and white communities were high.

Exhibition – Alphabetilately

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:
Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Since 1993 the Smithsonian National Postal Museum has developed engaging exhibitions and entertaining public programs for families, students and serious collectors.

To celebrate our 15th anniversary, the museum is showing an exhibition rich in philatelic fascination and designerly detail called, Alphabetilately!

ALPHABET + PHILATELY or Alphabetilately is the alphabet of philately.

Each of the 26 letters stands for some aspect of the collecting of stamps or the sending of mail. The stamps, ephemera, and artifacts exhibited in Alphabetilately graphically document the spectrum of the American experience, from historical subjects to popular culture, from actual events to important ideas.

Alphabetilately is a universally appealing exhibition and a lively educational experience for visitors of every age.

It provides an extraordinary showcase for selections from our unparalleled collection of American postal and philatelic history.

Exhibition – Pacific Exchange China And Us Mail

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Today, China and the United States are the world’s two largest economies, major powers that often cooperate strategically. They also share a complicated history. The two have been World War II allies and Cold War enemies, partners and rivals.

Using mail and stamps, Pacific Exchange brings a human scale to Chinese-U.S. relations in three areas: commerce, culture, and community. The exhibit focuses on the 1860s to the 1970s, a time of extraordinary change in China. It also explores Chinese immigration to the United States, now home to four million Chinese Americans.

Most Chinese names and locations in this exhibit are written in the modern pinyin style (for example, Beijing instead of Peking), with some exceptions.

The Chinese panels are written in simplified Chinese.

Exhibition – Home Sewn: Quilts From The Lower Mississippi Valley

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

The first in a series of collections-focused exhibitions, Home Sewn features quilts created by Annie Dennis (1904­­–1997) and Emma Russell (1909–2004). Quilts represent classic American quilt patterns and techniques passed down through five generations. This exhibition examine the generational, social, and economic fabric of an African American quilting community in rural Mississippi. In addition, fieldwork and interviews with present-day African American women quilters give voice to the continuing tradition of quilting in these communities.

Exhibition – Ubuhle Women: Beadwork And The Art Of Independence

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Ndwango (means “cloth”) is a new form of bead art developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Ubuhle (means “beautiful”) artists’ community was established in 1999 by local resident Bev Gibson and master beader Ntombephi Ntombela [En-Tom-be-Fi En-tom-bell-la] to empower local women with the means to provide for their families through their art. The flat surface of the textile onto which the Ubuhle women bead is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts that many of them grew up wearing. Using black fabric as a canvas and different colored Czech glass beads as the medium of expression, the Ubuhle community has re-imagined the longstanding beading tradition as a contemporary art form. Twenty-nine works are featured, including The African Cruxifixion.

Exhibition – Indelible: The Platinum Photographs Of Larry McNeil And Will Wilson

Date: November 22, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
Fourth Street and Jefferson Drive, SW
Washington, DC 20001
From: National Museum of The American Indian
Website: Click to visit the site

By the end of the 19th century, the platinum print process was of primary importance to art photographers—valued for its permanence, wide tonal variation, and “fuzzy” aesthetic. Photographers such as Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Käsebier, and Joseph Keiley famously printed their photographs of North American Indians on platinum paper, using the prints’ highly romanticizing softness to represent the “Vanishing Race.”

Larry McNeil (Tlingit/Nisgaá) and Will Wilson (Diné/Bilagaana) challenge this visual ideology. McNeil uses the platinum process to topple expectations of what constitutes the Native portrait and, more generally, Western conceptions of portraiture. Wilson creates portraits of “today’s Indians” on metal plates, then digitizes the plates, makes large-scale digital negatives from the scanned images, and uses historic printing processes in a wet darkroom—calling attention to the manufactured nature of all photographic images.

Sunday November 23rd, 2014

BALLET BOOT CAMP

Date: November 23, 2014 to November 25, 2014

Time: 6:30pm

Venue:

Address:

5640 Sunnyside Avenue Suite E

Beltsville, MD 20704

Cost: $100.00

From: Making Moves Dance Collective

Website: Click to visit the site

It’s time to get our kids up off the couch, have them put the iPhones and video games down and get moving!

Making Moves Dance Collective is hosting our 2nd annual Ballet Boot Camp.  We have a class and appropriate level for everyone ages 5 through 18!

You pay only $100 for the entire 6 week session.  Your dancer comes once a week, for 2 hours for six weeks and gets an hour of cardio work and an hour of either ballet or basic dance technique depending on his/her current level.

Our instructors can evaluate to make sure everyone is placed properly!

Greenbelt Farmers Market

Date: November 23, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Venue:

Address:

25 Crescent Road

Greenbelt, MD 20770

From: Greenbelt Farmers Market

Website: Click to visit the site

Hours: Season begins on May 11, 2014, Sundays from 10 am to 2 pm,
Location: Parking Lot Behind Greenbelt Municipal Building, 25 Crescent Road, Greenbelt, MD

Exhibition – Lost And Found Laurel

Date: November 23, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Venue:

Address:
817 Main Street
Laurel, MD 20707

From: History of The Laurel Historical Society

Website: Click to visit the site

The exhibit includes sections on schools, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, libraries, and festivals. A variety of objects ranging from trucks to high school football uniforms and varsity jackets to restaurant menus will be featured throughout. Highlights include a “Hershey” sign from Knapps News Service, a wall papered with matchbook covers from Laurel businesses, a “restaurant” area with tables and menus, and a school room. Visitors will also have the opportunity to help the Laurel Historical Society (LHS) identify unknown people and places that are part of its archives.
One section:  “The Good Old Days…?” is a sobering reminder that not all memories of the period were good ones.  The panel incorporates photos and newspaper stories from the 1960s. It reminds visitors that that Laurel citizens were struggling through integration efforts, KKK cross burnings and firebombs and that tensions between the black and white communities were high.

Exhibition – Alphabetilately

Date: November 23, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:
Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Since 1993 the Smithsonian National Postal Museum has developed engaging exhibitions and entertaining public programs for families, students and serious collectors.

To celebrate our 15th anniversary, the museum is showing an exhibition rich in philatelic fascination and designerly detail called, Alphabetilately!

ALPHABET + PHILATELY or Alphabetilately is the alphabet of philately.

Each of the 26 letters stands for some aspect of the collecting of stamps or the sending of mail. The stamps, ephemera, and artifacts exhibited in Alphabetilately graphically document the spectrum of the American experience, from historical subjects to popular culture, from actual events to important ideas.

Alphabetilately is a universally appealing exhibition and a lively educational experience for visitors of every age.

It provides an extraordinary showcase for selections from our unparalleled collection of American postal and philatelic history.

Exhibition – Pacific Exchange China And Us Mail

Date: November 23, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Today, China and the United States are the world’s two largest economies, major powers that often cooperate strategically. They also share a complicated history. The two have been World War II allies and Cold War enemies, partners and rivals.

Using mail and stamps, Pacific Exchange brings a human scale to Chinese-U.S. relations in three areas: commerce, culture, and community. The exhibit focuses on the 1860s to the 1970s, a time of extraordinary change in China. It also explores Chinese immigration to the United States, now home to four million Chinese Americans.

Most Chinese names and locations in this exhibit are written in the modern pinyin style (for example, Beijing instead of Peking), with some exceptions.

The Chinese panels are written in simplified Chinese.

Exhibition – Home Sewn: Quilts From The Lower Mississippi Valley

Date: November 23, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

The first in a series of collections-focused exhibitions, Home Sewn features quilts created by Annie Dennis (1904­­–1997) and Emma Russell (1909–2004). Quilts represent classic American quilt patterns and techniques passed down through five generations. This exhibition examine the generational, social, and economic fabric of an African American quilting community in rural Mississippi. In addition, fieldwork and interviews with present-day African American women quilters give voice to the continuing tradition of quilting in these communities.

Exhibition – Ubuhle Women: Beadwork And The Art Of Independence

Date: November 23, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Ndwango (means “cloth”) is a new form of bead art developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Ubuhle (means “beautiful”) artists’ community was established in 1999 by local resident Bev Gibson and master beader Ntombephi Ntombela [En-Tom-be-Fi En-tom-bell-la] to empower local women with the means to provide for their families through their art. The flat surface of the textile onto which the Ubuhle women bead is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts that many of them grew up wearing. Using black fabric as a canvas and different colored Czech glass beads as the medium of expression, the Ubuhle community has re-imagined the longstanding beading tradition as a contemporary art form. Twenty-nine works are featured, including The African Cruxifixion.

Exhibition – Indelible: The Platinum Photographs Of Larry McNeil And Will Wilson

Date: November 23, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
Fourth Street and Jefferson Drive, SW
Washington, DC 20001
From: National Museum of The American Indian
Website: Click to visit the site

By the end of the 19th century, the platinum print process was of primary importance to art photographers—valued for its permanence, wide tonal variation, and “fuzzy” aesthetic. Photographers such as Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Käsebier, and Joseph Keiley famously printed their photographs of North American Indians on platinum paper, using the prints’ highly romanticizing softness to represent the “Vanishing Race.”

Larry McNeil (Tlingit/Nisgaá) and Will Wilson (Diné/Bilagaana) challenge this visual ideology. McNeil uses the platinum process to topple expectations of what constitutes the Native portrait and, more generally, Western conceptions of portraiture. Wilson creates portraits of “today’s Indians” on metal plates, then digitizes the plates, makes large-scale digital negatives from the scanned images, and uses historic printing processes in a wet darkroom—calling attention to the manufactured nature of all photographic images.

Monday November 24th, 2014

BALLET BOOT CAMP

Date: November 23, 2014 to November 25, 2014

Time: 6:30pm

Venue:

Address:

5640 Sunnyside Avenue Suite E

Beltsville, MD 20704

Cost: $100.00

From: Making Moves Dance Collective

Website: Click to visit the site

It’s time to get our kids up off the couch, have them put the iPhones and video games down and get moving!

Making Moves Dance Collective is hosting our 2nd annual Ballet Boot Camp.  We have a class and appropriate level for everyone ages 5 through 18!

You pay only $100 for the entire 6 week session.  Your dancer comes once a week, for 2 hours for six weeks and gets an hour of cardio work and an hour of either ballet or basic dance technique depending on his/her current level.

Our instructors can evaluate to make sure everyone is placed properly!

Exhibition – Lost And Found Laurel

Date: November 24, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Venue:

Address:
817 Main Street
Laurel, MD 20707

From: History of The Laurel Historical Society

Website: Click to visit the site

The exhibit includes sections on schools, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, libraries, and festivals. A variety of objects ranging from trucks to high school football uniforms and varsity jackets to restaurant menus will be featured throughout. Highlights include a “Hershey” sign from Knapps News Service, a wall papered with matchbook covers from Laurel businesses, a “restaurant” area with tables and menus, and a school room. Visitors will also have the opportunity to help the Laurel Historical Society (LHS) identify unknown people and places that are part of its archives.
One section:  “The Good Old Days…?” is a sobering reminder that not all memories of the period were good ones.  The panel incorporates photos and newspaper stories from the 1960s. It reminds visitors that that Laurel citizens were struggling through integration efforts, KKK cross burnings and firebombs and that tensions between the black and white communities were high.

Exhibition – Alphabetilately

Date: November 24, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:
Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Since 1993 the Smithsonian National Postal Museum has developed engaging exhibitions and entertaining public programs for families, students and serious collectors.

To celebrate our 15th anniversary, the museum is showing an exhibition rich in philatelic fascination and designerly detail called, Alphabetilately!

ALPHABET + PHILATELY or Alphabetilately is the alphabet of philately.

Each of the 26 letters stands for some aspect of the collecting of stamps or the sending of mail. The stamps, ephemera, and artifacts exhibited in Alphabetilately graphically document the spectrum of the American experience, from historical subjects to popular culture, from actual events to important ideas.

Alphabetilately is a universally appealing exhibition and a lively educational experience for visitors of every age.

It provides an extraordinary showcase for selections from our unparalleled collection of American postal and philatelic history.

Exhibition – Pacific Exchange China And Us Mail

Date: November 24, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Today, China and the United States are the world’s two largest economies, major powers that often cooperate strategically. They also share a complicated history. The two have been World War II allies and Cold War enemies, partners and rivals.

Using mail and stamps, Pacific Exchange brings a human scale to Chinese-U.S. relations in three areas: commerce, culture, and community. The exhibit focuses on the 1860s to the 1970s, a time of extraordinary change in China. It also explores Chinese immigration to the United States, now home to four million Chinese Americans.

Most Chinese names and locations in this exhibit are written in the modern pinyin style (for example, Beijing instead of Peking), with some exceptions.

The Chinese panels are written in simplified Chinese.

Exhibition – Home Sewn: Quilts From The Lower Mississippi Valley

Date: November 24, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

The first in a series of collections-focused exhibitions, Home Sewn features quilts created by Annie Dennis (1904­­–1997) and Emma Russell (1909–2004). Quilts represent classic American quilt patterns and techniques passed down through five generations. This exhibition examine the generational, social, and economic fabric of an African American quilting community in rural Mississippi. In addition, fieldwork and interviews with present-day African American women quilters give voice to the continuing tradition of quilting in these communities.

Exhibition – Ubuhle Women: Beadwork And The Art Of Independence

Date: November 24, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Ndwango (means “cloth”) is a new form of bead art developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Ubuhle (means “beautiful”) artists’ community was established in 1999 by local resident Bev Gibson and master beader Ntombephi Ntombela [En-Tom-be-Fi En-tom-bell-la] to empower local women with the means to provide for their families through their art. The flat surface of the textile onto which the Ubuhle women bead is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts that many of them grew up wearing. Using black fabric as a canvas and different colored Czech glass beads as the medium of expression, the Ubuhle community has re-imagined the longstanding beading tradition as a contemporary art form. Twenty-nine works are featured, including The African Cruxifixion.

Exhibition – Indelible: The Platinum Photographs Of Larry McNeil And Will Wilson

Date: November 24, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
Fourth Street and Jefferson Drive, SW
Washington, DC 20001
From: National Museum of The American Indian
Website: Click to visit the site

By the end of the 19th century, the platinum print process was of primary importance to art photographers—valued for its permanence, wide tonal variation, and “fuzzy” aesthetic. Photographers such as Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Käsebier, and Joseph Keiley famously printed their photographs of North American Indians on platinum paper, using the prints’ highly romanticizing softness to represent the “Vanishing Race.”

Larry McNeil (Tlingit/Nisgaá) and Will Wilson (Diné/Bilagaana) challenge this visual ideology. McNeil uses the platinum process to topple expectations of what constitutes the Native portrait and, more generally, Western conceptions of portraiture. Wilson creates portraits of “today’s Indians” on metal plates, then digitizes the plates, makes large-scale digital negatives from the scanned images, and uses historic printing processes in a wet darkroom—calling attention to the manufactured nature of all photographic images.

Tuesday November 25th, 2014

Xtreme Teens: Turkey Treat

Date: November 25, 2014

Time: 3:00pm to 4:00pm

Venue:

Address:

4912 Nantucket Road

College Park, MD 20741

Cost: Free with M-NCPPC Youth ID

Website: Click to visit the site

In honor of Thanksgiving, be festive and create a sweet holiday treat. Instead of making a savory turkey, you’ll make a turkey using apples and other sweet treats.

Ages 10-12

BALLET BOOT CAMP

Date: November 23, 2014 to November 25, 2014

Time: 6:30pm

Venue:

Address:

5640 Sunnyside Avenue Suite E

Beltsville, MD 20704

Cost: $100.00

From: Making Moves Dance Collective

Website: Click to visit the site

It’s time to get our kids up off the couch, have them put the iPhones and video games down and get moving!

Making Moves Dance Collective is hosting our 2nd annual Ballet Boot Camp.  We have a class and appropriate level for everyone ages 5 through 18!

You pay only $100 for the entire 6 week session.  Your dancer comes once a week, for 2 hours for six weeks and gets an hour of cardio work and an hour of either ballet or basic dance technique depending on his/her current level.

Our instructors can evaluate to make sure everyone is placed properly!

Exhibition – Lost And Found Laurel

Date: November 25, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Venue:

Address:
817 Main Street
Laurel, MD 20707

From: History of The Laurel Historical Society

Website: Click to visit the site

The exhibit includes sections on schools, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, libraries, and festivals. A variety of objects ranging from trucks to high school football uniforms and varsity jackets to restaurant menus will be featured throughout. Highlights include a “Hershey” sign from Knapps News Service, a wall papered with matchbook covers from Laurel businesses, a “restaurant” area with tables and menus, and a school room. Visitors will also have the opportunity to help the Laurel Historical Society (LHS) identify unknown people and places that are part of its archives.
One section:  “The Good Old Days…?” is a sobering reminder that not all memories of the period were good ones.  The panel incorporates photos and newspaper stories from the 1960s. It reminds visitors that that Laurel citizens were struggling through integration efforts, KKK cross burnings and firebombs and that tensions between the black and white communities were high.

Exhibition – Alphabetilately

Date: November 25, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:
Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Since 1993 the Smithsonian National Postal Museum has developed engaging exhibitions and entertaining public programs for families, students and serious collectors.

To celebrate our 15th anniversary, the museum is showing an exhibition rich in philatelic fascination and designerly detail called, Alphabetilately!

ALPHABET + PHILATELY or Alphabetilately is the alphabet of philately.

Each of the 26 letters stands for some aspect of the collecting of stamps or the sending of mail. The stamps, ephemera, and artifacts exhibited in Alphabetilately graphically document the spectrum of the American experience, from historical subjects to popular culture, from actual events to important ideas.

Alphabetilately is a universally appealing exhibition and a lively educational experience for visitors of every age.

It provides an extraordinary showcase for selections from our unparalleled collection of American postal and philatelic history.

Exhibition – Pacific Exchange China And Us Mail

Date: November 25, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Today, China and the United States are the world’s two largest economies, major powers that often cooperate strategically. They also share a complicated history. The two have been World War II allies and Cold War enemies, partners and rivals.

Using mail and stamps, Pacific Exchange brings a human scale to Chinese-U.S. relations in three areas: commerce, culture, and community. The exhibit focuses on the 1860s to the 1970s, a time of extraordinary change in China. It also explores Chinese immigration to the United States, now home to four million Chinese Americans.

Most Chinese names and locations in this exhibit are written in the modern pinyin style (for example, Beijing instead of Peking), with some exceptions.

The Chinese panels are written in simplified Chinese.

Exhibition – Home Sewn: Quilts From The Lower Mississippi Valley

Date: November 25, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

The first in a series of collections-focused exhibitions, Home Sewn features quilts created by Annie Dennis (1904­­–1997) and Emma Russell (1909–2004). Quilts represent classic American quilt patterns and techniques passed down through five generations. This exhibition examine the generational, social, and economic fabric of an African American quilting community in rural Mississippi. In addition, fieldwork and interviews with present-day African American women quilters give voice to the continuing tradition of quilting in these communities.

Exhibition – Ubuhle Women: Beadwork And The Art Of Independence

Date: November 25, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Ndwango (means “cloth”) is a new form of bead art developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Ubuhle (means “beautiful”) artists’ community was established in 1999 by local resident Bev Gibson and master beader Ntombephi Ntombela [En-Tom-be-Fi En-tom-bell-la] to empower local women with the means to provide for their families through their art. The flat surface of the textile onto which the Ubuhle women bead is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts that many of them grew up wearing. Using black fabric as a canvas and different colored Czech glass beads as the medium of expression, the Ubuhle community has re-imagined the longstanding beading tradition as a contemporary art form. Twenty-nine works are featured, including The African Cruxifixion.

Exhibition – Indelible: The Platinum Photographs Of Larry McNeil And Will Wilson

Date: November 25, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
Fourth Street and Jefferson Drive, SW
Washington, DC 20001
From: National Museum of The American Indian
Website: Click to visit the site

By the end of the 19th century, the platinum print process was of primary importance to art photographers—valued for its permanence, wide tonal variation, and “fuzzy” aesthetic. Photographers such as Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Käsebier, and Joseph Keiley famously printed their photographs of North American Indians on platinum paper, using the prints’ highly romanticizing softness to represent the “Vanishing Race.”

Larry McNeil (Tlingit/Nisgaá) and Will Wilson (Diné/Bilagaana) challenge this visual ideology. McNeil uses the platinum process to topple expectations of what constitutes the Native portrait and, more generally, Western conceptions of portraiture. Wilson creates portraits of “today’s Indians” on metal plates, then digitizes the plates, makes large-scale digital negatives from the scanned images, and uses historic printing processes in a wet darkroom—calling attention to the manufactured nature of all photographic images.

Wednesday November 26th, 2014

Exhibition – Lost And Found Laurel

Date: November 26, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Venue:

Address:
817 Main Street
Laurel, MD 20707

From: History of The Laurel Historical Society

Website: Click to visit the site

The exhibit includes sections on schools, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, libraries, and festivals. A variety of objects ranging from trucks to high school football uniforms and varsity jackets to restaurant menus will be featured throughout. Highlights include a “Hershey” sign from Knapps News Service, a wall papered with matchbook covers from Laurel businesses, a “restaurant” area with tables and menus, and a school room. Visitors will also have the opportunity to help the Laurel Historical Society (LHS) identify unknown people and places that are part of its archives.
One section:  “The Good Old Days…?” is a sobering reminder that not all memories of the period were good ones.  The panel incorporates photos and newspaper stories from the 1960s. It reminds visitors that that Laurel citizens were struggling through integration efforts, KKK cross burnings and firebombs and that tensions between the black and white communities were high.

Exhibition – Alphabetilately

Date: November 26, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:
Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Since 1993 the Smithsonian National Postal Museum has developed engaging exhibitions and entertaining public programs for families, students and serious collectors.

To celebrate our 15th anniversary, the museum is showing an exhibition rich in philatelic fascination and designerly detail called, Alphabetilately!

ALPHABET + PHILATELY or Alphabetilately is the alphabet of philately.

Each of the 26 letters stands for some aspect of the collecting of stamps or the sending of mail. The stamps, ephemera, and artifacts exhibited in Alphabetilately graphically document the spectrum of the American experience, from historical subjects to popular culture, from actual events to important ideas.

Alphabetilately is a universally appealing exhibition and a lively educational experience for visitors of every age.

It provides an extraordinary showcase for selections from our unparalleled collection of American postal and philatelic history.

Exhibition – Pacific Exchange China And Us Mail

Date: November 26, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Today, China and the United States are the world’s two largest economies, major powers that often cooperate strategically. They also share a complicated history. The two have been World War II allies and Cold War enemies, partners and rivals.

Using mail and stamps, Pacific Exchange brings a human scale to Chinese-U.S. relations in three areas: commerce, culture, and community. The exhibit focuses on the 1860s to the 1970s, a time of extraordinary change in China. It also explores Chinese immigration to the United States, now home to four million Chinese Americans.

Most Chinese names and locations in this exhibit are written in the modern pinyin style (for example, Beijing instead of Peking), with some exceptions.

The Chinese panels are written in simplified Chinese.

Exhibition – Home Sewn: Quilts From The Lower Mississippi Valley

Date: November 26, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

The first in a series of collections-focused exhibitions, Home Sewn features quilts created by Annie Dennis (1904­­–1997) and Emma Russell (1909–2004). Quilts represent classic American quilt patterns and techniques passed down through five generations. This exhibition examine the generational, social, and economic fabric of an African American quilting community in rural Mississippi. In addition, fieldwork and interviews with present-day African American women quilters give voice to the continuing tradition of quilting in these communities.

Exhibition – Ubuhle Women: Beadwork And The Art Of Independence

Date: November 26, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Ndwango (means “cloth”) is a new form of bead art developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Ubuhle (means “beautiful”) artists’ community was established in 1999 by local resident Bev Gibson and master beader Ntombephi Ntombela [En-Tom-be-Fi En-tom-bell-la] to empower local women with the means to provide for their families through their art. The flat surface of the textile onto which the Ubuhle women bead is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts that many of them grew up wearing. Using black fabric as a canvas and different colored Czech glass beads as the medium of expression, the Ubuhle community has re-imagined the longstanding beading tradition as a contemporary art form. Twenty-nine works are featured, including The African Cruxifixion.

Exhibition – Indelible: The Platinum Photographs Of Larry McNeil And Will Wilson

Date: November 26, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
Fourth Street and Jefferson Drive, SW
Washington, DC 20001
From: National Museum of The American Indian
Website: Click to visit the site

By the end of the 19th century, the platinum print process was of primary importance to art photographers—valued for its permanence, wide tonal variation, and “fuzzy” aesthetic. Photographers such as Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Käsebier, and Joseph Keiley famously printed their photographs of North American Indians on platinum paper, using the prints’ highly romanticizing softness to represent the “Vanishing Race.”

Larry McNeil (Tlingit/Nisgaá) and Will Wilson (Diné/Bilagaana) challenge this visual ideology. McNeil uses the platinum process to topple expectations of what constitutes the Native portrait and, more generally, Western conceptions of portraiture. Wilson creates portraits of “today’s Indians” on metal plates, then digitizes the plates, makes large-scale digital negatives from the scanned images, and uses historic printing processes in a wet darkroom—calling attention to the manufactured nature of all photographic images.

Thursday November 27th, 2014

Exhibition – Lost And Found Laurel

Date: November 27, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 2:00pm

Venue:

Address:
817 Main Street
Laurel, MD 20707

From: History of The Laurel Historical Society

Website: Click to visit the site

The exhibit includes sections on schools, restaurants, entertainment, shopping, libraries, and festivals. A variety of objects ranging from trucks to high school football uniforms and varsity jackets to restaurant menus will be featured throughout. Highlights include a “Hershey” sign from Knapps News Service, a wall papered with matchbook covers from Laurel businesses, a “restaurant” area with tables and menus, and a school room. Visitors will also have the opportunity to help the Laurel Historical Society (LHS) identify unknown people and places that are part of its archives.
One section:  “The Good Old Days…?” is a sobering reminder that not all memories of the period were good ones.  The panel incorporates photos and newspaper stories from the 1960s. It reminds visitors that that Laurel citizens were struggling through integration efforts, KKK cross burnings and firebombs and that tensions between the black and white communities were high.

Exhibition – Alphabetilately

Date: November 27, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:
Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Since 1993 the Smithsonian National Postal Museum has developed engaging exhibitions and entertaining public programs for families, students and serious collectors.

To celebrate our 15th anniversary, the museum is showing an exhibition rich in philatelic fascination and designerly detail called, Alphabetilately!

ALPHABET + PHILATELY or Alphabetilately is the alphabet of philately.

Each of the 26 letters stands for some aspect of the collecting of stamps or the sending of mail. The stamps, ephemera, and artifacts exhibited in Alphabetilately graphically document the spectrum of the American experience, from historical subjects to popular culture, from actual events to important ideas.

Alphabetilately is a universally appealing exhibition and a lively educational experience for visitors of every age.

It provides an extraordinary showcase for selections from our unparalleled collection of American postal and philatelic history.

Exhibition – Pacific Exchange China And Us Mail

Date: November 27, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
2 Massachusetts Avenue,North East
Washington, DC 20002

Cost: Free

From: National Postal Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Today, China and the United States are the world’s two largest economies, major powers that often cooperate strategically. They also share a complicated history. The two have been World War II allies and Cold War enemies, partners and rivals.

Using mail and stamps, Pacific Exchange brings a human scale to Chinese-U.S. relations in three areas: commerce, culture, and community. The exhibit focuses on the 1860s to the 1970s, a time of extraordinary change in China. It also explores Chinese immigration to the United States, now home to four million Chinese Americans.

Most Chinese names and locations in this exhibit are written in the modern pinyin style (for example, Beijing instead of Peking), with some exceptions.

The Chinese panels are written in simplified Chinese.

Exhibition – Home Sewn: Quilts From The Lower Mississippi Valley

Date: November 27, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

The first in a series of collections-focused exhibitions, Home Sewn features quilts created by Annie Dennis (1904­­–1997) and Emma Russell (1909–2004). Quilts represent classic American quilt patterns and techniques passed down through five generations. This exhibition examine the generational, social, and economic fabric of an African American quilting community in rural Mississippi. In addition, fieldwork and interviews with present-day African American women quilters give voice to the continuing tradition of quilting in these communities.

Exhibition – Ubuhle Women: Beadwork And The Art Of Independence

Date: November 27, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:00pm

Venue:
Address:
1901 Fort Place Southeast
Washington, DC 20020

From: The Anacostia Community Museum

Website: Click to visit the site

Ndwango (means “cloth”) is a new form of bead art developed by a community of women living and working together in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The Ubuhle (means “beautiful”) artists’ community was established in 1999 by local resident Bev Gibson and master beader Ntombephi Ntombela [En-Tom-be-Fi En-tom-bell-la] to empower local women with the means to provide for their families through their art. The flat surface of the textile onto which the Ubuhle women bead is reminiscent of the Xhosa headscarves and skirts that many of them grew up wearing. Using black fabric as a canvas and different colored Czech glass beads as the medium of expression, the Ubuhle community has re-imagined the longstanding beading tradition as a contemporary art form. Twenty-nine works are featured, including The African Cruxifixion.

Exhibition – Indelible: The Platinum Photographs Of Larry McNeil And Will Wilson

Date: November 27, 2014

Time: 10:00am to 5:30pm

Venue:

Address:
Fourth Street and Jefferson Drive, SW
Washington, DC 20001
From: National Museum of The American Indian
Website: Click to visit the site

By the end of the 19th century, the platinum print process was of primary importance to art photographers—valued for its permanence, wide tonal variation, and “fuzzy” aesthetic. Photographers such as Edward S. Curtis, Gertrude Käsebier, and Joseph Keiley famously printed their photographs of North American Indians on platinum paper, using the prints’ highly romanticizing softness to represent the “Vanishing Race.”

Larry McNeil (Tlingit/Nisgaá) and Will Wilson (Diné/Bilagaana) challenge this visual ideology. McNeil uses the platinum process to topple expectations of what constitutes the Native portrait and, more generally, Western conceptions of portraiture. Wilson creates portraits of “today’s Indians” on metal plates, then digitizes the plates, makes large-scale digital negatives from the scanned images, and uses historic printing processes in a wet darkroom—calling attention to the manufactured nature of all photographic images.

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